The education system in England..

Education

The education system in England is similar to the education system in France in many ways. It still has a number of differences that it is good to understand when you want to educate your children there. In particular, it is very decentralized and leaves a great deal of autonomy to schools.

Note, for example, two major differences with the school system in France. 98% of English schools require their students to wear a uniform, whether in public or private. Boarding schools are very popular there, there are more than 500 in Great Britain.

Compulsory education
From the age of 5 until the age of 18, it is compulsory to follow some form of education in England. The term education is however relatively broad and covers alternative training or homeschooling.

The Foundation Stage , also called Nursery School , is the equivalent of our first two years of kindergarten and its end marks the beginning of compulsory schooling. It is managed by the private sector.

Education system in England

Primary Education, Key Stage 1&2
In the education system in England, primary education is divided into two levels:

Key Stage 1 takes place over two years and welcomes students aged between 5 and 7 years old where they learn the basics in a way very similar to the French education system. This is punctuated by an exam during the second year also called Key Stage 1 .
Key Stage 2 takes place over four years and welcomes students aged between 7 and 11 years old. At the end of this, students must take a new exam called Key Stage 2 .
If you can choose to enroll your children in a private establishment, the vast majority of establishments are public and as such, free.

Secondary Education, Key Stage 3&4
Secondary education in the education system in England is divided into two levels:

Key Stage 3 takes place over three years and corresponds to the first three years of middle school in France. It welcomes students aged 11 to 14. At the end of Key Stage 3 , students are asked to choose their subjects for the General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) exams. Between 15 and 40 subjects are offered, of which 6 are compulsory. The minimum number of subjects to be chosen is nevertheless between 9 and 12 depending on the establishment.
Key Stage 4 takes place over two years and welcomes students aged between 14 and 16 years old. The end of Key Stage 4 is marked by the GCSE exam. At the end of this, students can choose to leave the general circuit or continue to pass the A-Levels, similar to the baccalaureate.
At this stage, you can choose to register your child for free in a public school like 90% of English people. It should be noted that these can be denominational as well as secular, unlike France. Teaching is based on the National Curriculum which defines the compulsory or recommended subjects.

You can also choose an independent or public school , including private school. There are more than 2,600 in the United Kingdom, which cater for around 6.5% of English pupils. Although scholarships are available, these are fee-based and often expensive, costing up to £30,000 per year. They also do not have to conform to the National Curriculum but are inspected and approved. The private system is particularly elitist and expensive but enjoys an excellent international reputation, we can cite for example Eton College , through which many ministers have passed as well as members of the royal and English families and certain foreign royal families.

Post-16 Secondary Education or Key Stage 5
The education system in England obliges children to continue an education until they are 18 (against 16 in France). Nevertheless, the term education is taken in its broad sense and encompasses many academic or vocational options.

You can continue in the general academic system in a Sixth form , a Grammar school or a Senior school to obtain your A-Levels, a level 3 qualification of the BTEC type or even an international baccalaureate.

You can choose a City Technology College , a specialized secondary public school such as the BRIT school for performing arts and technology , which counts personalities such as Amy Winehouse and Adele among its former students.

Finally, you can decide to do an apprenticeship or apprenticeship that combines teaching concrete skills with experience in the world of work.

Higher education, Higher education
Education system in England

Higher education in England is similar to that we have in France and is provided by the English university system which consists of colleges , university colleges and universities . There are 2 cycles:

The Undergraduate cycle which lasts between 3 and 4 years and ends with obtaining a Bachelor Degree , equivalent to the French License.
The Postgraduate cycle , the duration of which may vary and which consists of the Master and the Phd or doctorate.
Note that there is a significant difference in cost between these two cycles. The Undergraduate course costs an average of £6,000 per year, a figure that can climb to £9,000 in some establishments. The Postgraduate cycle can cost much more. There are often additional costs for foreign students, so be careful when registering.

Undergraduate registrations in British universities and colleges are centralized by the Universities and Colleges Admissions Services (UCAS) with the exception of Cambridge and Oxford which have their own procedures.

You will need a Proficiency exam when English is not your first language (IELTS or TOEFL for example) and possibly letters of recommendation from your teachers. Registrations generally take place between September 1 and January 15 of the previous year, so plan ahead!

Find out more on our page on the best universities in England .

The education system in England is similar to the education system in France in many ways. It still has a number of differences that it is good to understand when you want to educate your children there. In particular, it is very decentralized and leaves a great deal of autonomy to schools.

Note, for example, two major differences with the school system in France. 98% of English schools require their students to wear a uniform, whether in public or private. Boarding schools are very popular there, there are more than 500 in Great Britain.

Compulsory education
From the age of 5 until the age of 18, it is compulsory to follow some form of education in England. The term education is however relatively broad and covers alternative training or homeschooling.

The Foundation Stage , also called Nursery School , is the equivalent of our first two years of kindergarten and its end marks the beginning of compulsory schooling. It is managed by the private sector.

Education system in England

Primary Education, Key Stage 1&2
In the education system in England, primary education is divided into two levels:

Key Stage 1 takes place over two years and welcomes students aged between 5 and 7 years old where they learn the basics in a way very similar to the French education system. This is punctuated by an exam during the second year also called Key Stage 1 .
Key Stage 2 takes place over four years and welcomes students aged between 7 and 11 years old. At the end of this, students must take a new exam called Key Stage 2 .
If you can choose to enroll your children in a private establishment, the vast majority of establishments are public and as such, free.

Secondary Education, Key Stage 3&4
Secondary education in the education system in England is divided into two levels:

Key Stage 3 takes place over three years and corresponds to the first three years of middle school in France. It welcomes students aged 11 to 14. At the end of Key Stage 3 , students are asked to choose their subjects for the General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) exams. Between 15 and 40 subjects are offered, of which 6 are compulsory. The minimum number of subjects to be chosen is nevertheless between 9 and 12 depending on the establishment.
Key Stage 4 takes place over two years and welcomes students aged between 14 and 16 years old. The end of Key Stage 4 is marked by the GCSE exam. At the end of this, students can choose to leave the general circuit or continue to pass the A-Levels, similar to the baccalaureate.
At this stage, you can choose to register your child for free in a public school like 90% of English people. It should be noted that these can be denominational as well as secular, unlike France. Teaching is based on the National Curriculum which defines the compulsory or recommended subjects.

You can also choose an independent or public school , including private school. There are more than 2,600 in the United Kingdom, which cater for around 6.5% of English pupils. Although scholarships are available, these are fee-based and often expensive, costing up to £30,000 per year. They also do not have to conform to the National Curriculum but are inspected and approved. The private system is particularly elitist and expensive but enjoys an excellent international reputation, we can cite for example Eton College , through which many ministers have passed as well as members of the royal and English families and certain foreign royal families.

Post-16 Secondary Education or Key Stage 5
The education system in England obliges children to continue an education until they are 18 (against 16 in France). Nevertheless, the term education is taken in its broad sense and encompasses many academic or vocational options.

You can continue in the general academic system in a Sixth form , a Grammar school or a Senior school to obtain your A-Levels, a level 3 qualification of the BTEC type or even an international baccalaureate.

You can choose a City Technology College , a specialized secondary public school such as the BRIT school for performing arts and technology , which counts personalities such as Amy Winehouse and Adele among its former students.

Finally, you can decide to do an apprenticeship or apprenticeship that combines teaching concrete skills with experience in the world of work.

Higher education, Higher education
Education system in England

Higher education in England is similar to that we have in France and is provided by the English university system which consists of colleges , university colleges and universities . There are 2 cycles:

The Undergraduate cycle which lasts between 3 and 4 years and ends with obtaining a Bachelor Degree , equivalent to the French License.
The Postgraduate cycle , the duration of which may vary and which consists of the Master and the Phd or doctorate.
Note that there is a significant difference in cost between these two cycles. The Undergraduate course costs an average of £6,000 per year, a figure that can climb to £9,000 in some establishments. The Postgraduate cycle can cost much more. There are often additional costs for foreign students, so be careful when registering.

Undergraduate registrations in British universities and colleges are centralized by the Universities and Colleges Admissions Services (UCAS) with the exception of Cambridge and Oxford which have their own procedures.

You will need a Proficiency exam when English is not your first language (IELTS or TOEFL for example) and possibly letters of recommendation from your teachers. Registrations generally take place between September 1 and January 15 of the previous year, so plan ahead!

Find out more on our page on the best universities in England .

The education system in England is similar to the education system in France in many ways. It still has a number of differences that it is good to understand when you want to educate your children there. In particular, it is very decentralized and leaves a great deal of autonomy to schools.

Note, for example, two major differences with the school system in France. 98% of English schools require their students to wear a uniform, whether in public or private. Boarding schools are very popular there, there are more than 500 in Great Britain.

Compulsory education
From the age of 5 until the age of 18, it is compulsory to follow some form of education in England. The term education is however relatively broad and covers alternative training or homeschooling.

The Foundation Stage , also called Nursery School , is the equivalent of our first two years of kindergarten and its end marks the beginning of compulsory schooling. It is managed by the private sector.

Education system in England

Primary Education, Key Stage 1&2
In the education system in England, primary education is divided into two levels:

Key Stage 1 takes place over two years and welcomes students aged between 5 and 7 years old where they learn the basics in a way very similar to the French education system. This is punctuated by an exam during the second year also called Key Stage 1 .
Key Stage 2 takes place over four years and welcomes students aged between 7 and 11 years old. At the end of this, students must take a new exam called Key Stage 2 .
If you can choose to enroll your children in a private establishment, the vast majority of establishments are public and as such, free.

Secondary Education, Key Stage 3&4
Secondary education in the education system in England is divided into two levels:

Key Stage 3 takes place over three years and corresponds to the first three years of middle school in France. It welcomes students aged 11 to 14. At the end of Key Stage 3 , students are asked to choose their subjects for the General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) exams. Between 15 and 40 subjects are offered, of which 6 are compulsory. The minimum number of subjects to be chosen is nevertheless between 9 and 12 depending on the establishment.
Key Stage 4 takes place over two years and welcomes students aged between 14 and 16 years old. The end of Key Stage 4 is marked by the GCSE exam. At the end of this, students can choose to leave the general circuit or continue to pass the A-Levels, similar to the baccalaureate.
At this stage, you can choose to register your child for free in a public school like 90% of English people. It should be noted that these can be denominational as well as secular, unlike France. Teaching is based on the National Curriculum which defines the compulsory or recommended subjects.

You can also choose an independent or public school , including private school. There are more than 2,600 in the United Kingdom, which cater for around 6.5% of English pupils. Although scholarships are available, these are fee-based and often expensive, costing up to £30,000 per year. They also do not have to conform to the National Curriculum but are inspected and approved. The private system is particularly elitist and expensive but enjoys an excellent international reputation, we can cite for example Eton College , through which many ministers have passed as well as members of the royal and English families and certain foreign royal families.

Post-16 Secondary Education or Key Stage 5
The education system in England obliges children to continue an education until they are 18 (against 16 in France). Nevertheless, the term education is taken in its broad sense and encompasses many academic or vocational options.

You can continue in the general academic system in a Sixth form , a Grammar school or a Senior school to obtain your A-Levels, a level 3 qualification of the BTEC type or even an international baccalaureate.

You can choose a City Technology College , a specialized secondary public school such as the BRIT school for performing arts and technology , which counts personalities such as Amy Winehouse and Adele among its former students.

Finally, you can decide to do an apprenticeship or apprenticeship that combines teaching concrete skills with experience in the world of work.

Higher education, Higher education
Education system in England

Higher education in England is similar to that we have in France and is provided by the English university system which consists of colleges , university colleges and universities . There are 2 cycles:

The Undergraduate cycle which lasts between 3 and 4 years and ends with obtaining a Bachelor Degree , equivalent to the French License.
The Postgraduate cycle , the duration of which may vary and which consists of the Master and the Phd or doctorate.
Note that there is a significant difference in cost between these two cycles. The Undergraduate course costs an average of £6,000 per year, a figure that can climb to £9,000 in some establishments. The Postgraduate cycle can cost much more. There are often additional costs for foreign students, so be careful when registering.

Undergraduate registrations in British universities and colleges are centralized by the Universities and Colleges Admissions Services (UCAS) with the exception of Cambridge and Oxford which have their own procedures.

You will need a Proficiency exam when English is not your first language (IELTS or TOEFL for example) and possibly letters of recommendation from your teachers. Registrations generally take place between September 1 and January 15 of the previous year, so plan ahead!

Find out more on our page on the best universities in England .

The education system in England is similar to the education system in France in many ways. It still has a number of differences that it is good to understand when you want to educate your children there. In particular, it is very decentralized and leaves a great deal of autonomy to schools.

Note, for example, two major differences with the school system in France. 98% of English schools require their students to wear a uniform, whether in public or private. Boarding schools are very popular there, there are more than 500 in Great Britain.

Compulsory education
From the age of 5 until the age of 18, it is compulsory to follow some form of education in England. The term education is however relatively broad and covers alternative training or homeschooling.

The Foundation Stage , also called Nursery School , is the equivalent of our first two years of kindergarten and its end marks the beginning of compulsory schooling. It is managed by the private sector.

Education system in England

Primary Education, Key Stage 1&2
In the education system in England, primary education is divided into two levels:

Key Stage 1 takes place over two years and welcomes students aged between 5 and 7 years old where they learn the basics in a way very similar to the French education system. This is punctuated by an exam during the second year also called Key Stage 1 .
Key Stage 2 takes place over four years and welcomes students aged between 7 and 11 years old. At the end of this, students must take a new exam called Key Stage 2 .
If you can choose to enroll your children in a private establishment, the vast majority of establishments are public and as such, free.

Secondary Education, Key Stage 3&4
Secondary education in the education system in England is divided into two levels:

Key Stage 3 takes place over three years and corresponds to the first three years of middle school in France. It welcomes students aged 11 to 14. At the end of Key Stage 3 , students are asked to choose their subjects for the General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) exams. Between 15 and 40 subjects are offered, of which 6 are compulsory. The minimum number of subjects to be chosen is nevertheless between 9 and 12 depending on the establishment.
Key Stage 4 takes place over two years and welcomes students aged between 14 and 16 years old. The end of Key Stage 4 is marked by the GCSE exam. At the end of this, students can choose to leave the general circuit or continue to pass the A-Levels, similar to the baccalaureate.
At this stage, you can choose to register your child for free in a public school like 90% of English people. It should be noted that these can be denominational as well as secular, unlike France. Teaching is based on the National Curriculum which defines the compulsory or recommended subjects.

You can also choose an independent or public school , including private school. There are more than 2,600 in the United Kingdom, which cater for around 6.5% of English pupils. Although scholarships are available, these are fee-based and often expensive, costing up to £30,000 per year. They also do not have to conform to the National Curriculum but are inspected and approved. The private system is particularly elitist and expensive but enjoys an excellent international reputation, we can cite for example Eton College , through which many ministers have passed as well as members of the royal and English families and certain foreign royal families.

Post-16 Secondary Education or Key Stage 5
The education system in England obliges children to continue an education until they are 18 (against 16 in France). Nevertheless, the term education is taken in its broad sense and encompasses many academic or vocational options.

You can continue in the general academic system in a Sixth form , a Grammar school or a Senior school to obtain your A-Levels, a level 3 qualification of the BTEC type or even an international baccalaureate.

You can choose a City Technology College , a specialized secondary public school such as the BRIT school for performing arts and technology , which counts personalities such as Amy Winehouse and Adele among its former students.

Finally, you can decide to do an apprenticeship or apprenticeship that combines teaching concrete skills with experience in the world of work.

Higher education, Higher education
Education system in England

Higher education in England is similar to that we have in France and is provided by the English university system which consists of colleges , university colleges and universities . There are 2 cycles:

The Undergraduate cycle which lasts between 3 and 4 years and ends with obtaining a Bachelor Degree , equivalent to the French License.
The Postgraduate cycle , the duration of which may vary and which consists of the Master and the Phd or doctorate.
Note that there is a significant difference in cost between these two cycles. The Undergraduate course costs an average of £6,000 per year, a figure that can climb to £9,000 in some establishments. The Postgraduate cycle can cost much more. There are often additional costs for foreign students, so be careful when registering.

Undergraduate registrations in British universities and colleges are centralized by the Universities and Colleges Admissions Services (UCAS) with the exception of Cambridge and Oxford which have their own procedures.

You will need a Proficiency exam when English is not your first language (IELTS or TOEFL for example) and possibly letters of recommendation from your teachers. Registrations generally take place between September 1 and January 15 of the previous year, so plan ahead!

Find out more on our page on the best universities in England .

ALSO READ :  Admission and enrollment in primary and secondary

The education system in England is similar to the education system in France in many ways. It still has a number of differences that it is good to understand when you want to educate your children there. In particular, it is very decentralized and leaves a great deal of autonomy to schools.

Note, for example, two major differences with the school system in France. 98% of English schools require their students to wear a uniform, whether in public or private. Boarding schools are very popular there, there are more than 500 in Great Britain.

Compulsory education
From the age of 5 until the age of 18, it is compulsory to follow some form of education in England. The term education is however relatively broad and covers alternative training or homeschooling.

The Foundation Stage , also called Nursery School , is the equivalent of our first two years of kindergarten and its end marks the beginning of compulsory schooling. It is managed by the private sector.

Education system in England

Primary Education, Key Stage 1&2
In the education system in England, primary education is divided into two levels:

Key Stage 1 takes place over two years and welcomes students aged between 5 and 7 years old where they learn the basics in a way very similar to the French education system. This is punctuated by an exam during the second year also called Key Stage 1 .
Key Stage 2 takes place over four years and welcomes students aged between 7 and 11 years old. At the end of this, students must take a new exam called Key Stage 2 .
If you can choose to enroll your children in a private establishment, the vast majority of establishments are public and as such, free.

Secondary Education, Key Stage 3&4
Secondary education in the education system in England is divided into two levels:

Key Stage 3 takes place over three years and corresponds to the first three years of middle school in France. It welcomes students aged 11 to 14. At the end of Key Stage 3 , students are asked to choose their subjects for the General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) exams. Between 15 and 40 subjects are offered, of which 6 are compulsory. The minimum number of subjects to be chosen is nevertheless between 9 and 12 depending on the establishment.
Key Stage 4 takes place over two years and welcomes students aged between 14 and 16 years old. The end of Key Stage 4 is marked by the GCSE exam. At the end of this, students can choose to leave the general circuit or continue to pass the A-Levels, similar to the baccalaureate.
At this stage, you can choose to register your child for free in a public school like 90% of English people. It should be noted that these can be denominational as well as secular, unlike France. Teaching is based on the National Curriculum which defines the compulsory or recommended subjects.

You can also choose an independent or public school , including private school. There are more than 2,600 in the United Kingdom, which cater for around 6.5% of English pupils. Although scholarships are available, these are fee-based and often expensive, costing up to £30,000 per year. They also do not have to conform to the National Curriculum but are inspected and approved. The private system is particularly elitist and expensive but enjoys an excellent international reputation, we can cite for example Eton College , through which many ministers have passed as well as members of the royal and English families and certain foreign royal families.

Post-16 Secondary Education or Key Stage 5
The education system in England obliges children to continue an education until they are 18 (against 16 in France). Nevertheless, the term education is taken in its broad sense and encompasses many academic or vocational options.

You can continue in the general academic system in a Sixth form , a Grammar school or a Senior school to obtain your A-Levels, a level 3 qualification of the BTEC type or even an international baccalaureate.

You can choose a City Technology College , a specialized secondary public school such as the BRIT school for performing arts and technology , which counts personalities such as Amy Winehouse and Adele among its former students.

Finally, you can decide to do an apprenticeship or apprenticeship that combines teaching concrete skills with experience in the world of work.

Higher education, Higher education
Education system in England

Higher education in England is similar to that we have in France and is provided by the English university system which consists of colleges , university colleges and universities . There are 2 cycles:

The Undergraduate cycle which lasts between 3 and 4 years and ends with obtaining a Bachelor Degree , equivalent to the French License.
The Postgraduate cycle , the duration of which may vary and which consists of the Master and the Phd or doctorate.
Note that there is a significant difference in cost between these two cycles. The Undergraduate course costs an average of £6,000 per year, a figure that can climb to £9,000 in some establishments. The Postgraduate cycle can cost much more. There are often additional costs for foreign students, so be careful when registering.

Undergraduate registrations in British universities and colleges are centralized by the Universities and Colleges Admissions Services (UCAS) with the exception of Cambridge and Oxford which have their own procedures.

You will need a Proficiency exam when English is not your first language (IELTS or TOEFL for example) and possibly letters of recommendation from your teachers. Registrations generally take place between September 1 and January 15 of the previous year, so plan ahead!

Find out more on our page on the best universities in England .

The education system in England is similar to the education system in France in many ways. It still has a number of differences that it is good to understand when you want to educate your children there. In particular, it is very decentralized and leaves a great deal of autonomy to schools.

Note, for example, two major differences with the school system in France. 98% of English schools require their students to wear a uniform, whether in public or private. Boarding schools are very popular there, there are more than 500 in Great Britain.

Compulsory education
From the age of 5 until the age of 18, it is compulsory to follow some form of education in England. The term education is however relatively broad and covers alternative training or homeschooling.

The Foundation Stage , also called Nursery School , is the equivalent of our first two years of kindergarten and its end marks the beginning of compulsory schooling. It is managed by the private sector.

Education system in England

Primary Education, Key Stage 1&2
In the education system in England, primary education is divided into two levels:

Key Stage 1 takes place over two years and welcomes students aged between 5 and 7 years old where they learn the basics in a way very similar to the French education system. This is punctuated by an exam during the second year also called Key Stage 1 .
Key Stage 2 takes place over four years and welcomes students aged between 7 and 11 years old. At the end of this, students must take a new exam called Key Stage 2 .
If you can choose to enroll your children in a private establishment, the vast majority of establishments are public and as such, free.

Secondary Education, Key Stage 3&4
Secondary education in the education system in England is divided into two levels:

Key Stage 3 takes place over three years and corresponds to the first three years of middle school in France. It welcomes students aged 11 to 14. At the end of Key Stage 3 , students are asked to choose their subjects for the General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) exams. Between 15 and 40 subjects are offered, of which 6 are compulsory. The minimum number of subjects to be chosen is nevertheless between 9 and 12 depending on the establishment.
Key Stage 4 takes place over two years and welcomes students aged between 14 and 16 years old. The end of Key Stage 4 is marked by the GCSE exam. At the end of this, students can choose to leave the general circuit or continue to pass the A-Levels, similar to the baccalaureate.
At this stage, you can choose to register your child for free in a public school like 90% of English people. It should be noted that these can be denominational as well as secular, unlike France. Teaching is based on the National Curriculum which defines the compulsory or recommended subjects.

You can also choose an independent or public school , including private school. There are more than 2,600 in the United Kingdom, which cater for around 6.5% of English pupils. Although scholarships are available, these are fee-based and often expensive, costing up to £30,000 per year. They also do not have to conform to the National Curriculum but are inspected and approved. The private system is particularly elitist and expensive but enjoys an excellent international reputation, we can cite for example Eton College , through which many ministers have passed as well as members of the royal and English families and certain foreign royal families.

Post-16 Secondary Education or Key Stage 5
The education system in England obliges children to continue an education until they are 18 (against 16 in France). Nevertheless, the term education is taken in its broad sense and encompasses many academic or vocational options.

You can continue in the general academic system in a Sixth form , a Grammar school or a Senior school to obtain your A-Levels, a level 3 qualification of the BTEC type or even an international baccalaureate.

You can choose a City Technology College , a specialized secondary public school such as the BRIT school for performing arts and technology , which counts personalities such as Amy Winehouse and Adele among its former students.

Finally, you can decide to do an apprenticeship or apprenticeship that combines teaching concrete skills with experience in the world of work.

Higher education, Higher education
Education system in England

Higher education in England is similar to that we have in France and is provided by the English university system which consists of colleges , university colleges and universities . There are 2 cycles:

The Undergraduate cycle which lasts between 3 and 4 years and ends with obtaining a Bachelor Degree , equivalent to the French License.
The Postgraduate cycle , the duration of which may vary and which consists of the Master and the Phd or doctorate.
Note that there is a significant difference in cost between these two cycles. The Undergraduate course costs an average of £6,000 per year, a figure that can climb to £9,000 in some establishments. The Postgraduate cycle can cost much more. There are often additional costs for foreign students, so be careful when registering.

Undergraduate registrations in British universities and colleges are centralized by the Universities and Colleges Admissions Services (UCAS) with the exception of Cambridge and Oxford which have their own procedures.

You will need a Proficiency exam when English is not your first language (IELTS or TOEFL for example) and possibly letters of recommendation from your teachers. Registrations generally take place between September 1 and January 15 of the previous year, so plan ahead!

Find out more on our page on the best universities in England .

The education system in England is similar to the education system in France in many ways. It still has a number of differences that it is good to understand when you want to educate your children there. In particular, it is very decentralized and leaves a great deal of autonomy to schools.

Note, for example, two major differences with the school system in France. 98% of English schools require their students to wear a uniform, whether in public or private. Boarding schools are very popular there, there are more than 500 in Great Britain.

Compulsory education
From the age of 5 until the age of 18, it is compulsory to follow some form of education in England. The term education is however relatively broad and covers alternative training or homeschooling.

The Foundation Stage , also called Nursery School , is the equivalent of our first two years of kindergarten and its end marks the beginning of compulsory schooling. It is managed by the private sector.

Education system in England

Primary Education, Key Stage 1&2
In the education system in England, primary education is divided into two levels:

Key Stage 1 takes place over two years and welcomes students aged between 5 and 7 years old where they learn the basics in a way very similar to the French education system. This is punctuated by an exam during the second year also called Key Stage 1 .
Key Stage 2 takes place over four years and welcomes students aged between 7 and 11 years old. At the end of this, students must take a new exam called Key Stage 2 .
If you can choose to enroll your children in a private establishment, the vast majority of establishments are public and as such, free.

Secondary Education, Key Stage 3&4
Secondary education in the education system in England is divided into two levels:

Key Stage 3 takes place over three years and corresponds to the first three years of middle school in France. It welcomes students aged 11 to 14. At the end of Key Stage 3 , students are asked to choose their subjects for the General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) exams. Between 15 and 40 subjects are offered, of which 6 are compulsory. The minimum number of subjects to be chosen is nevertheless between 9 and 12 depending on the establishment.
Key Stage 4 takes place over two years and welcomes students aged between 14 and 16 years old. The end of Key Stage 4 is marked by the GCSE exam. At the end of this, students can choose to leave the general circuit or continue to pass the A-Levels, similar to the baccalaureate.
At this stage, you can choose to register your child for free in a public school like 90% of English people. It should be noted that these can be denominational as well as secular, unlike France. Teaching is based on the National Curriculum which defines the compulsory or recommended subjects.

You can also choose an independent or public school , including private school. There are more than 2,600 in the United Kingdom, which cater for around 6.5% of English pupils. Although scholarships are available, these are fee-based and often expensive, costing up to £30,000 per year. They also do not have to conform to the National Curriculum but are inspected and approved. The private system is particularly elitist and expensive but enjoys an excellent international reputation, we can cite for example Eton College , through which many ministers have passed as well as members of the royal and English families and certain foreign royal families.

Post-16 Secondary Education or Key Stage 5
The education system in England obliges children to continue an education until they are 18 (against 16 in France). Nevertheless, the term education is taken in its broad sense and encompasses many academic or vocational options.

You can continue in the general academic system in a Sixth form , a Grammar school or a Senior school to obtain your A-Levels, a level 3 qualification of the BTEC type or even an international baccalaureate.

You can choose a City Technology College , a specialized secondary public school such as the BRIT school for performing arts and technology , which counts personalities such as Amy Winehouse and Adele among its former students.

Finally, you can decide to do an apprenticeship or apprenticeship that combines teaching concrete skills with experience in the world of work.

Higher education, Higher education
Education system in England

Higher education in England is similar to that we have in France and is provided by the English university system which consists of colleges , university colleges and universities . There are 2 cycles:

The Undergraduate cycle which lasts between 3 and 4 years and ends with obtaining a Bachelor Degree , equivalent to the French License.
The Postgraduate cycle , the duration of which may vary and which consists of the Master and the Phd or doctorate.
Note that there is a significant difference in cost between these two cycles. The Undergraduate course costs an average of £6,000 per year, a figure that can climb to £9,000 in some establishments. The Postgraduate cycle can cost much more. There are often additional costs for foreign students, so be careful when registering.

Undergraduate registrations in British universities and colleges are centralized by the Universities and Colleges Admissions Services (UCAS) with the exception of Cambridge and Oxford which have their own procedures.

You will need a Proficiency exam when English is not your first language (IELTS or TOEFL for example) and possibly letters of recommendation from your teachers. Registrations generally take place between September 1 and January 15 of the previous year, so plan ahead!

Find out more on our page on the best universities in England .

The education system in England is similar to the education system in France in many ways. It still has a number of differences that it is good to understand when you want to educate your children there. In particular, it is very decentralized and leaves a great deal of autonomy to schools.

Note, for example, two major differences with the school system in France. 98% of English schools require their students to wear a uniform, whether in public or private. Boarding schools are very popular there, there are more than 500 in Great Britain.

Compulsory education
From the age of 5 until the age of 18, it is compulsory to follow some form of education in England. The term education is however relatively broad and covers alternative training or homeschooling.

The Foundation Stage , also called Nursery School , is the equivalent of our first two years of kindergarten and its end marks the beginning of compulsory schooling. It is managed by the private sector.

Education system in England

Primary Education, Key Stage 1&2
In the education system in England, primary education is divided into two levels:

Key Stage 1 takes place over two years and welcomes students aged between 5 and 7 years old where they learn the basics in a way very similar to the French education system. This is punctuated by an exam during the second year also called Key Stage 1 .
Key Stage 2 takes place over four years and welcomes students aged between 7 and 11 years old. At the end of this, students must take a new exam called Key Stage 2 .
If you can choose to enroll your children in a private establishment, the vast majority of establishments are public and as such, free.

Secondary Education, Key Stage 3&4
Secondary education in the education system in England is divided into two levels:

Key Stage 3 takes place over three years and corresponds to the first three years of middle school in France. It welcomes students aged 11 to 14. At the end of Key Stage 3 , students are asked to choose their subjects for the General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) exams. Between 15 and 40 subjects are offered, of which 6 are compulsory. The minimum number of subjects to be chosen is nevertheless between 9 and 12 depending on the establishment.
Key Stage 4 takes place over two years and welcomes students aged between 14 and 16 years old. The end of Key Stage 4 is marked by the GCSE exam. At the end of this, students can choose to leave the general circuit or continue to pass the A-Levels, similar to the baccalaureate.
At this stage, you can choose to register your child for free in a public school like 90% of English people. It should be noted that these can be denominational as well as secular, unlike France. Teaching is based on the National Curriculum which defines the compulsory or recommended subjects.

You can also choose an independent or public school , including private school. There are more than 2,600 in the United Kingdom, which cater for around 6.5% of English pupils. Although scholarships are available, these are fee-based and often expensive, costing up to £30,000 per year. They also do not have to conform to the National Curriculum but are inspected and approved. The private system is particularly elitist and expensive but enjoys an excellent international reputation, we can cite for example Eton College , through which many ministers have passed as well as members of the royal and English families and certain foreign royal families.

Post-16 Secondary Education or Key Stage 5
The education system in England obliges children to continue an education until they are 18 (against 16 in France). Nevertheless, the term education is taken in its broad sense and encompasses many academic or vocational options.

You can continue in the general academic system in a Sixth form , a Grammar school or a Senior school to obtain your A-Levels, a level 3 qualification of the BTEC type or even an international baccalaureate.

You can choose a City Technology College , a specialized secondary public school such as the BRIT school for performing arts and technology , which counts personalities such as Amy Winehouse and Adele among its former students.

Finally, you can decide to do an apprenticeship or apprenticeship that combines teaching concrete skills with experience in the world of work.

Higher education, Higher education
Education system in England

Higher education in England is similar to that we have in France and is provided by the English university system which consists of colleges , university colleges and universities . There are 2 cycles:

The Undergraduate cycle which lasts between 3 and 4 years and ends with obtaining a Bachelor Degree , equivalent to the French License.
The Postgraduate cycle , the duration of which may vary and which consists of the Master and the Phd or doctorate.
Note that there is a significant difference in cost between these two cycles. The Undergraduate course costs an average of £6,000 per year, a figure that can climb to £9,000 in some establishments. The Postgraduate cycle can cost much more. There are often additional costs for foreign students, so be careful when registering.

Undergraduate registrations in British universities and colleges are centralized by the Universities and Colleges Admissions Services (UCAS) with the exception of Cambridge and Oxford which have their own procedures.

You will need a Proficiency exam when English is not your first language (IELTS or TOEFL for example) and possibly letters of recommendation from your teachers. Registrations generally take place between September 1 and January 15 of the previous year, so plan ahead!

Find out more on our page on the best universities in England .

The education system in England is similar to the education system in France in many ways. It still has a number of differences that it is good to understand when you want to educate your children there. In particular, it is very decentralized and leaves a great deal of autonomy to schools.

ALSO READ :  The education system in Germany

Note, for example, two major differences with the school system in France. 98% of English schools require their students to wear a uniform, whether in public or private. Boarding schools are very popular there, there are more than 500 in Great Britain.

Compulsory education
From the age of 5 until the age of 18, it is compulsory to follow some form of education in England. The term education is however relatively broad and covers alternative training or homeschooling.

The Foundation Stage , also called Nursery School , is the equivalent of our first two years of kindergarten and its end marks the beginning of compulsory schooling. It is managed by the private sector.

Education system in England

Primary Education, Key Stage 1&2
In the education system in England, primary education is divided into two levels:

Key Stage 1 takes place over two years and welcomes students aged between 5 and 7 years old where they learn the basics in a way very similar to the French education system. This is punctuated by an exam during the second year also called Key Stage 1 .
Key Stage 2 takes place over four years and welcomes students aged between 7 and 11 years old. At the end of this, students must take a new exam called Key Stage 2 .
If you can choose to enroll your children in a private establishment, the vast majority of establishments are public and as such, free.

Secondary Education, Key Stage 3&4
Secondary education in the education system in England is divided into two levels:

Key Stage 3 takes place over three years and corresponds to the first three years of middle school in France. It welcomes students aged 11 to 14. At the end of Key Stage 3 , students are asked to choose their subjects for the General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) exams. Between 15 and 40 subjects are offered, of which 6 are compulsory. The minimum number of subjects to be chosen is nevertheless between 9 and 12 depending on the establishment.
Key Stage 4 takes place over two years and welcomes students aged between 14 and 16 years old. The end of Key Stage 4 is marked by the GCSE exam. At the end of this, students can choose to leave the general circuit or continue to pass the A-Levels, similar to the baccalaureate.
At this stage, you can choose to register your child for free in a public school like 90% of English people. It should be noted that these can be denominational as well as secular, unlike France. Teaching is based on the National Curriculum which defines the compulsory or recommended subjects.

You can also choose an independent or public school , including private school. There are more than 2,600 in the United Kingdom, which cater for around 6.5% of English pupils. Although scholarships are available, these are fee-based and often expensive, costing up to £30,000 per year. They also do not have to conform to the National Curriculum but are inspected and approved. The private system is particularly elitist and expensive but enjoys an excellent international reputation, we can cite for example Eton College , through which many ministers have passed as well as members of the royal and English families and certain foreign royal families.

Post-16 Secondary Education or Key Stage 5
The education system in England obliges children to continue an education until they are 18 (against 16 in France). Nevertheless, the term education is taken in its broad sense and encompasses many academic or vocational options.

You can continue in the general academic system in a Sixth form , a Grammar school or a Senior school to obtain your A-Levels, a level 3 qualification of the BTEC type or even an international baccalaureate.

You can choose a City Technology College , a specialized secondary public school such as the BRIT school for performing arts and technology , which counts personalities such as Amy Winehouse and Adele among its former students.

Finally, you can decide to do an apprenticeship or apprenticeship that combines teaching concrete skills with experience in the world of work.

Higher education, Higher education
Education system in England

Higher education in England is similar to that we have in France and is provided by the English university system which consists of colleges , university colleges and universities . There are 2 cycles:

The Undergraduate cycle which lasts between 3 and 4 years and ends with obtaining a Bachelor Degree , equivalent to the French License.
The Postgraduate cycle , the duration of which may vary and which consists of the Master and the Phd or doctorate.
Note that there is a significant difference in cost between these two cycles. The Undergraduate course costs an average of £6,000 per year, a figure that can climb to £9,000 in some establishments. The Postgraduate cycle can cost much more. There are often additional costs for foreign students, so be careful when registering.

Undergraduate registrations in British universities and colleges are centralized by the Universities and Colleges Admissions Services (UCAS) with the exception of Cambridge and Oxford which have their own procedures.

You will need a Proficiency exam when English is not your first language (IELTS or TOEFL for example) and possibly letters of recommendation from your teachers. Registrations generally take place between September 1 and January 15 of the previous year, so plan ahead!

Find out more on our page on the best universities in England .

The education system in England is similar to the education system in France in many ways. It still has a number of differences that it is good to understand when you want to educate your children there. In particular, it is very decentralized and leaves a great deal of autonomy to schools.

Note, for example, two major differences with the school system in France. 98% of English schools require their students to wear a uniform, whether in public or private. Boarding schools are very popular there, there are more than 500 in Great Britain.

Compulsory education
From the age of 5 until the age of 18, it is compulsory to follow some form of education in England. The term education is however relatively broad and covers alternative training or homeschooling.

The Foundation Stage , also called Nursery School , is the equivalent of our first two years of kindergarten and its end marks the beginning of compulsory schooling. It is managed by the private sector.

Education system in England

Primary Education, Key Stage 1&2
In the education system in England, primary education is divided into two levels:

Key Stage 1 takes place over two years and welcomes students aged between 5 and 7 years old where they learn the basics in a way very similar to the French education system. This is punctuated by an exam during the second year also called Key Stage 1 .
Key Stage 2 takes place over four years and welcomes students aged between 7 and 11 years old. At the end of this, students must take a new exam called Key Stage 2 .
If you can choose to enroll your children in a private establishment, the vast majority of establishments are public and as such, free.

Secondary Education, Key Stage 3&4
Secondary education in the education system in England is divided into two levels:

Key Stage 3 takes place over three years and corresponds to the first three years of middle school in France. It welcomes students aged 11 to 14. At the end of Key Stage 3 , students are asked to choose their subjects for the General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) exams. Between 15 and 40 subjects are offered, of which 6 are compulsory. The minimum number of subjects to be chosen is nevertheless between 9 and 12 depending on the establishment.
Key Stage 4 takes place over two years and welcomes students aged between 14 and 16 years old. The end of Key Stage 4 is marked by the GCSE exam. At the end of this, students can choose to leave the general circuit or continue to pass the A-Levels, similar to the baccalaureate.
At this stage, you can choose to register your child for free in a public school like 90% of English people. It should be noted that these can be denominational as well as secular, unlike France. Teaching is based on the National Curriculum which defines the compulsory or recommended subjects.

You can also choose an independent or public school , including private school. There are more than 2,600 in the United Kingdom, which cater for around 6.5% of English pupils. Although scholarships are available, these are fee-based and often expensive, costing up to £30,000 per year. They also do not have to conform to the National Curriculum but are inspected and approved. The private system is particularly elitist and expensive but enjoys an excellent international reputation, we can cite for example Eton College , through which many ministers have passed as well as members of the royal and English families and certain foreign royal families.

Post-16 Secondary Education or Key Stage 5
The education system in England obliges children to continue an education until they are 18 (against 16 in France). Nevertheless, the term education is taken in its broad sense and encompasses many academic or vocational options.

You can continue in the general academic system in a Sixth form , a Grammar school or a Senior school to obtain your A-Levels, a level 3 qualification of the BTEC type or even an international baccalaureate.

You can choose a City Technology College , a specialized secondary public school such as the BRIT school for performing arts and technology , which counts personalities such as Amy Winehouse and Adele among its former students.

Finally, you can decide to do an apprenticeship or apprenticeship that combines teaching concrete skills with experience in the world of work.

Higher education, Higher education
Education system in England

Higher education in England is similar to that we have in France and is provided by the English university system which consists of colleges , university colleges and universities . There are 2 cycles:

The Undergraduate cycle which lasts between 3 and 4 years and ends with obtaining a Bachelor Degree , equivalent to the French License.
The Postgraduate cycle , the duration of which may vary and which consists of the Master and the Phd or doctorate.
Note that there is a significant difference in cost between these two cycles. The Undergraduate course costs an average of £6,000 per year, a figure that can climb to £9,000 in some establishments. The Postgraduate cycle can cost much more. There are often additional costs for foreign students, so be careful when registering.

Undergraduate registrations in British universities and colleges are centralized by the Universities and Colleges Admissions Services (UCAS) with the exception of Cambridge and Oxford which have their own procedures.

You will need a Proficiency exam when English is not your first language (IELTS or TOEFL for example) and possibly letters of recommendation from your teachers. Registrations generally take place between September 1 and January 15 of the previous year, so plan ahead!

Find out more on our page on the best universities in England .

The education system in England is similar to the education system in France in many ways. It still has a number of differences that it is good to understand when you want to educate your children there. In particular, it is very decentralized and leaves a great deal of autonomy to schools.

Note, for example, two major differences with the school system in France. 98% of English schools require their students to wear a uniform, whether in public or private. Boarding schools are very popular there, there are more than 500 in Great Britain.

Compulsory education
From the age of 5 until the age of 18, it is compulsory to follow some form of education in England. The term education is however relatively broad and covers alternative training or homeschooling.

The Foundation Stage , also called Nursery School , is the equivalent of our first two years of kindergarten and its end marks the beginning of compulsory schooling. It is managed by the private sector.

Education system in England

Primary Education, Key Stage 1&2
In the education system in England, primary education is divided into two levels:

Key Stage 1 takes place over two years and welcomes students aged between 5 and 7 years old where they learn the basics in a way very similar to the French education system. This is punctuated by an exam during the second year also called Key Stage 1 .
Key Stage 2 takes place over four years and welcomes students aged between 7 and 11 years old. At the end of this, students must take a new exam called Key Stage 2 .
If you can choose to enroll your children in a private establishment, the vast majority of establishments are public and as such, free.

Secondary Education, Key Stage 3&4
Secondary education in the education system in England is divided into two levels:

Key Stage 3 takes place over three years and corresponds to the first three years of middle school in France. It welcomes students aged 11 to 14. At the end of Key Stage 3 , students are asked to choose their subjects for the General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) exams. Between 15 and 40 subjects are offered, of which 6 are compulsory. The minimum number of subjects to be chosen is nevertheless between 9 and 12 depending on the establishment.
Key Stage 4 takes place over two years and welcomes students aged between 14 and 16 years old. The end of Key Stage 4 is marked by the GCSE exam. At the end of this, students can choose to leave the general circuit or continue to pass the A-Levels, similar to the baccalaureate.
At this stage, you can choose to register your child for free in a public school like 90% of English people. It should be noted that these can be denominational as well as secular, unlike France. Teaching is based on the National Curriculum which defines the compulsory or recommended subjects.

You can also choose an independent or public school , including private school. There are more than 2,600 in the United Kingdom, which cater for around 6.5% of English pupils. Although scholarships are available, these are fee-based and often expensive, costing up to £30,000 per year. They also do not have to conform to the National Curriculum but are inspected and approved. The private system is particularly elitist and expensive but enjoys an excellent international reputation, we can cite for example Eton College , through which many ministers have passed as well as members of the royal and English families and certain foreign royal families.

Post-16 Secondary Education or Key Stage 5
The education system in England obliges children to continue an education until they are 18 (against 16 in France). Nevertheless, the term education is taken in its broad sense and encompasses many academic or vocational options.

You can continue in the general academic system in a Sixth form , a Grammar school or a Senior school to obtain your A-Levels, a level 3 qualification of the BTEC type or even an international baccalaureate.

You can choose a City Technology College , a specialized secondary public school such as the BRIT school for performing arts and technology , which counts personalities such as Amy Winehouse and Adele among its former students.

Finally, you can decide to do an apprenticeship or apprenticeship that combines teaching concrete skills with experience in the world of work.

Higher education, Higher education
Education system in England

Higher education in England is similar to that we have in France and is provided by the English university system which consists of colleges , university colleges and universities . There are 2 cycles:

The Undergraduate cycle which lasts between 3 and 4 years and ends with obtaining a Bachelor Degree , equivalent to the French License.
The Postgraduate cycle , the duration of which may vary and which consists of the Master and the Phd or doctorate.
Note that there is a significant difference in cost between these two cycles. The Undergraduate course costs an average of £6,000 per year, a figure that can climb to £9,000 in some establishments. The Postgraduate cycle can cost much more. There are often additional costs for foreign students, so be careful when registering.

Undergraduate registrations in British universities and colleges are centralized by the Universities and Colleges Admissions Services (UCAS) with the exception of Cambridge and Oxford which have their own procedures.

You will need a Proficiency exam when English is not your first language (IELTS or TOEFL for example) and possibly letters of recommendation from your teachers. Registrations generally take place between September 1 and January 15 of the previous year, so plan ahead!

Find out more on our page on the best universities in England .

The education system in England is similar to the education system in France in many ways. It still has a number of differences that it is good to understand when you want to educate your children there. In particular, it is very decentralized and leaves a great deal of autonomy to schools.

Note, for example, two major differences with the school system in France. 98% of English schools require their students to wear a uniform, whether in public or private. Boarding schools are very popular there, there are more than 500 in Great Britain.

Compulsory education
From the age of 5 until the age of 18, it is compulsory to follow some form of education in England. The term education is however relatively broad and covers alternative training or homeschooling.

The Foundation Stage , also called Nursery School , is the equivalent of our first two years of kindergarten and its end marks the beginning of compulsory schooling. It is managed by the private sector.

Education system in England

Primary Education, Key Stage 1&2
In the education system in England, primary education is divided into two levels:

Key Stage 1 takes place over two years and welcomes students aged between 5 and 7 years old where they learn the basics in a way very similar to the French education system. This is punctuated by an exam during the second year also called Key Stage 1 .
Key Stage 2 takes place over four years and welcomes students aged between 7 and 11 years old. At the end of this, students must take a new exam called Key Stage 2 .
If you can choose to enroll your children in a private establishment, the vast majority of establishments are public and as such, free.

Secondary Education, Key Stage 3&4
Secondary education in the education system in England is divided into two levels:

Key Stage 3 takes place over three years and corresponds to the first three years of middle school in France. It welcomes students aged 11 to 14. At the end of Key Stage 3 , students are asked to choose their subjects for the General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) exams. Between 15 and 40 subjects are offered, of which 6 are compulsory. The minimum number of subjects to be chosen is nevertheless between 9 and 12 depending on the establishment.
Key Stage 4 takes place over two years and welcomes students aged between 14 and 16 years old. The end of Key Stage 4 is marked by the GCSE exam. At the end of this, students can choose to leave the general circuit or continue to pass the A-Levels, similar to the baccalaureate.
At this stage, you can choose to register your child for free in a public school like 90% of English people. It should be noted that these can be denominational as well as secular, unlike France. Teaching is based on the National Curriculum which defines the compulsory or recommended subjects.

You can also choose an independent or public school , including private school. There are more than 2,600 in the United Kingdom, which cater for around 6.5% of English pupils. Although scholarships are available, these are fee-based and often expensive, costing up to £30,000 per year. They also do not have to conform to the National Curriculum but are inspected and approved. The private system is particularly elitist and expensive but enjoys an excellent international reputation, we can cite for example Eton College , through which many ministers have passed as well as members of the royal and English families and certain foreign royal families.

Post-16 Secondary Education or Key Stage 5
The education system in England obliges children to continue an education until they are 18 (against 16 in France). Nevertheless, the term education is taken in its broad sense and encompasses many academic or vocational options.

You can continue in the general academic system in a Sixth form , a Grammar school or a Senior school to obtain your A-Levels, a level 3 qualification of the BTEC type or even an international baccalaureate.

You can choose a City Technology College , a specialized secondary public school such as the BRIT school for performing arts and technology , which counts personalities such as Amy Winehouse and Adele among its former students.

Finally, you can decide to do an apprenticeship or apprenticeship that combines teaching concrete skills with experience in the world of work.

Higher education, Higher education
Education system in England

Higher education in England is similar to that we have in France and is provided by the English university system which consists of colleges , university colleges and universities . There are 2 cycles:

The Undergraduate cycle which lasts between 3 and 4 years and ends with obtaining a Bachelor Degree , equivalent to the French License.
The Postgraduate cycle , the duration of which may vary and which consists of the Master and the Phd or doctorate.
Note that there is a significant difference in cost between these two cycles. The Undergraduate course costs an average of £6,000 per year, a figure that can climb to £9,000 in some establishments. The Postgraduate cycle can cost much more. There are often additional costs for foreign students, so be careful when registering.

Undergraduate registrations in British universities and colleges are centralized by the Universities and Colleges Admissions Services (UCAS) with the exception of Cambridge and Oxford which have their own procedures.

You will need a Proficiency exam when English is not your first language (IELTS or TOEFL for example) and possibly letters of recommendation from your teachers. Registrations generally take place between September 1 and January 15 of the previous year, so plan ahead!

Find out more on our page on the best universities in England .

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *